Advanced  
YIC-IR  > 滨海湿地实验室  > 期刊论文
Title:
Growth and physiological responses to water and nutrient stress in oil palm
Author: Sun, Cheng-xu2; Cao, Hong-xing2; Shao, HongBo(邵宏波)1,3; Lei, Xin-tao2; Xiao, Yong2
Source: AFRICAN JOURNAL OF BIOTECHNOLOGY
ISSN: 1684-5315
Issued Date: 2011-09-07
Volume: 10, Issue:51, Pages:10465-10471
Keyword: Plant growth ; physiology response ; nutrient concentration ; water stress ; nutrient stress
Subject: Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology
Rank: [Shao, Hong-bo] CAS, Yantai Inst Coastal Zone Res, CAS Shandong Prov Key Lab Coastal Environm Proc, Yantai 264003, Shandong, Peoples R China; [Sun, Cheng-xu; Cao, Hong-xing; Lei, Xin-tao; Xiao, Yong] Chinese Acad Trop Agr Sci, Coconut Res Inst, Hainan Key Lab Trop Oil Crops Biol, Wenchang 571339, Hainan, Peoples R China; [Shao, Hong-bo] QUST, Inst Life Sci, Qingdao 266042, Shandong, Peoples R China
Corresponding Author: Shao, HB (reprint author), CAS, Yantai Inst Coastal Zone Res, CAS Shandong Prov Key Lab Coastal Environm Proc, Yantai 264003, Shandong, Peoples R China
Department: 滨海湿地实验室 
Abstract: The research was conducted to detect changes in growth, physiology and nutrient concentration in response to two watering regimes (well-watered and water-stress conditions) and to two nutrient regimes (with or without fertilization) of oil palm. Under stress conditions, changes in plant growth, dry matter allocation, relative water content, leaf relative conductivity, leaf N, P and K concentration are usually observed. These characteristics and related parameters were determined and the experiment results are listed as follows: (1) fertilization promoted the growth of oil palm under well-watered conditions, while under water stress conditions its effects on growth was negative. The ratio of root/shoot was increased under water stress condition; (2) relative water content and chlorophyll a/b content were gradually decreased while leaf relative conductivity was increased quickly under water and nutrient stress conditions during the experiment. It is obvious that water stress had a greater influence than nutrient stress on these parameters; (3) water and nutrient stress decreased leaf nitrogen and phosphorus concentration but increased potassium concentration; the combination of water and nutrient stress made significant effects on nitrogen and phosphorus concentration, but no significant effects on potassium concentration. Moreover, deficiency of both water and nutrients in combination had the greatest impact on changes in these traits of oil palm.
English Abstract: The research was conducted to detect changes in growth, physiology and nutrient concentration in response to two watering regimes (well-watered and water-stress conditions) and to two nutrient regimes (with or without fertilization) of oil palm. Under stress conditions, changes in plant growth, dry matter allocation, relative water content, leaf relative conductivity, leaf N, P and K concentration are usually observed. These characteristics and related parameters were determined and the experiment results are listed as follows: (1) fertilization promoted the growth of oil palm under well-watered conditions, while under water stress conditions its effects on growth was negative. The ratio of root/shoot was increased under water stress condition; (2) relative water content and chlorophyll a/b content were gradually decreased while leaf relative conductivity was increased quickly under water and nutrient stress conditions during the experiment. It is obvious that water stress had a greater influence than nutrient stress on these parameters; (3) water and nutrient stress decreased leaf nitrogen and phosphorus concentration but increased potassium concentration; the combination of water and nutrient stress made significant effects on nitrogen and phosphorus concentration, but no significant effects on potassium concentration. Moreover, deficiency of both water and nutrients in combination had the greatest impact on changes in these traits of oil palm.
WOS Subject Extended: Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology
WOS Keyword Plus: USE EFFICIENCY ; NITROGEN STRESS ; WINTER-WHEAT ; PLANT-GROWTH ; DRY-MATTER ; SOIL-WATER ; PHOTOSYNTHESIS ; SEEDLINGS ; MAIZE ; ACCUMULATION
DOC Type: Article
Indexed Type: SCI
Language: 英语
WOS ID: WOS:000298391500018
Citation statistics:
Content Type: 期刊论文
URI: http://ir.yic.ac.cn/handle/133337/5315
Appears in Collections:滨海湿地实验室_期刊论文

Files in This Item: Download All
File Name/ File Size Content Type Version Access License
Growth and physiological responses to water and nutrient stress in oil palm.pdf(91KB)----开放获取--View Download

description.institution: 1.CAS, Yantai Inst Coastal Zone Res, CAS Shandong Prov Key Lab Coastal Environm Proc, Yantai 264003, Shandong, Peoples R China
2.Chinese Acad Trop Agr Sci, Coconut Res Inst, Hainan Key Lab Trop Oil Crops Biol, Wenchang 571339, Hainan, Peoples R China
3.QUST, Inst Life Sci, Qingdao 266042, Shandong, Peoples R China

Recommended Citation:
Sun, Cheng-xu,Cao, Hong-xing,Shao, Hong-bo,et al. Growth and physiological responses to water and nutrient stress in oil palm[J]. AFRICAN JOURNAL OF BIOTECHNOLOGY,2011,10(51):10465-10471.
Service
Recommend this item
Sava as my favorate item
Show this item's statistics
Export Endnote File
Google Scholar
Similar articles in Google Scholar
[Sun, Cheng-xu]'s Articles
[Cao, Hong-xing]'s Articles
[Shao, Hong-bo]'s Articles
CSDL cross search
Similar articles in CSDL Cross Search
[Sun, Cheng-xu]‘s Articles
[Cao, Hong-xing]‘s Articles
[Shao, Hong-bo]‘s Articles
Related Copyright Policies
Null
Social Bookmarking
Add to CiteULike Add to Connotea Add to Del.icio.us Add to Digg Add to Reddit
文件名: Growth and physiological responses to water and nutrient stress in oil palm.pdf
格式: Adobe PDF
此文件暂不支持浏览
所有评论 (0)
暂无评论
 
评注功能仅针对注册用户开放,请您登录
您对该条目有什么异议,请填写以下表单,管理员会尽快联系您。
内 容:
Email:  *
单位:
验证码:   刷新
您在IR的使用过程中有什么好的想法或者建议可以反馈给我们。
标 题:
 *
内 容:
Email:  *
验证码:   刷新

Items in IR are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

 

 

Valid XHTML 1.0!
Copyright © 2007-2017  中国科学院烟台海岸带研究所 - Feedback
Powered by CSpace